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Thursday 14 December 2017
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Conwy / Denbighshire Integrated Offender Management Unit - 8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report

KR/RF/9/1.0
Author: Jonathon Hill and Simon Roberts, Wales Probation

Contents

  • Introduction

    • Background

    • IOM in Conwy / Denbighshire

  • Performance

    • Caseload

    • Criminogenic Needs

    • Summary of Costs and Benefits

    • Arrests

    • Convictions

    • Cost of Crime

 

 

Introduction

This report summarises the performance of the Conwy / Denbighshire Integrated Offender Management Unit (IOMU) in its supervision of offenders on the 8 Ways scheme, during April 2011 to March 2012.

 

Background

In the Home Office Research document ‘Process Evaluation of Five Integrated Offender Management (IOM) Pioneer Areas’ (May 2011), IOM is described as;

 

‘The most developed attempt to operationalise the concept of end to end offender management.  An IOM approach aims to co-ordinate all relevant agencies to deliver interventions for offenders identified as warranting intensive engagement, whatever their statutory status.  At the core of IOM is the delivery of a managed set of interventions, sequenced and tailored to respond to the risks and needs of the individual.  These interventions have the key aim of disrupting the offender’s criminal activity and thereby reducing their re-offending’.

   

 

IOM in Conwy / Denbighshire

The four key objectives of the IOMU are;

  • Reduce crime, reduce re-offending and improve public confidence in the criminal justice system.

  • Address potential overlaps between existing approaches and programmes to manage offenders and address gaps.

  • Align the work of local criminal justice agencies, expanding and improving on partnerships that already exist at the local, area and regional level with wider social agendas.

  • Simplify and strengthen governance, to provide greater clarity around respective roles and responsibilities - including leadership, operational decision-making and allocation of resources.

 

  

At a strategic level, the unit has joint governance via a North Wales Police (NWP) Superintendent and a Wales Probation Trust (WPT) Assistant Chief Executive.

At the operational level, the unit is led by a NWP Sergeant and a Senior Probation Officer from WPT.

 

The IOMU was established in April 2011 and comprises 5 Police Officers and 3 Offender Managers (Probation Officers). The unit manages a cohort of Prolific & Priority Offenders (PPOs) and a middle tier of offenders known as 8 Ways clients. Those who ‘sign-up’ to the 8 Ways scheme must agree to stop offending.

 

In order to achieve its objectives, the team works with a range of partner agencies such as, CAIS, ARCH Initiatives Cymru, Local Authority Housing Departments, National Health Trusts, Job Centre Plus, NACRO, MIND, Youth Offending Teams, CJIW and other voluntary agencies.

 

Working in collaboration with its partners, the team aims to;

 

  • Identify the most criminally active offenders and provide appropriate interventions to tackle the factors that may increase their likelihood of re-offending. 

  • Work with young people, and their families, who are most at risk of falling into a serious criminal career.

  • Link with the Child Safeguarding Agenda and the role of the Children and Family Social Case Service.

  • Forge stronger alliances across agencies to encourage proactive means to address offending and criminogenic needs of service users.

  • Provide appropriate services and interventions for offenders across the seven Pathways highlighted in the Regional Reducing Re-offending Delivery Plan.

  • Ensure there are multi-agency plans devised for individual offenders, which are actively managed on a dynamic basis, to reduce the cycle of failure.

 

 

Engaging with 8 Ways, offenders are given help and support to address their criminogenic needs, by accessing the following services.

 

 

Performance

Caseload

A total of 132 offenders have been assessed and considered for the scheme.

 

 

Just over half of these (73) were not accepted onto the scheme, due to their offending rates and cost of crime being too low.

Of the 59 who were offered support, 51 offenders (86%) joined the scheme.

During the year, 21 offenders (42%) have left the scheme. The current caseload at the end of the period is 30.

 

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 3

Of those no longer on the scheme, 10 left of their own volition, whilst 11 were removed by the unit, due to their continued offending and/or lack of engagement.

 

Two of the cases removed from the scheme were recalled and are still in custody.

 

 

Gender

The 51 participants are comprised of 47 males (92%) and 4 females (8%). The proportion of females is lower than is found in the overall Conwy / Denbighshire Probation caseload (12%).

 

 

Race/Ethnicity

Each of the participants have identified their ethnicity as White (British, Welsh, English)

 

 

Age

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 4

 

The average age of 8 Ways participants is 27, a figure which is very similar to that of the cases included in the five pioneer areas (27.5).

It is noticeable that the average age of all cases on the Conwy / Denbighshire Probation caseload is significantly higher (34).

 

 

Type of Supervision

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 5

 

37 of the 51 cases are subject to statutory supervision (73%). This is higher than the average of the five pioneer areas involved in the pilot study. In this study the proportion of statutory cases ranged from 34% to 74%.

 

 

Supervision Tier

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 6

 

Almost two thirds (33) of 8 Ways cases have been assessed as being tier 3. The chart above shows how the 8 Ways caseload compares to the Conwy / Denbighshire caseload as a whole.

 

 

Criminogenic Needs

The chart below compares the criminogenic needs of 8 Ways participants, as identified by the offenders themselves, with their needs according to their respective OASys assessments. Also depicted is the average level of need amongst the Conwy / Denbighshire Probation caseload.

 

When making any comparisons, it is important to note the differences in the way the needs have been identified. The Probation caseload figures are derived from the Offender Assessment System (OASys), which determines whether the respective needs are linked to offending, or not.

 

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 7

 

As can be seen, the disparity between the needs identified by the offenders (8 Ways) and the level of need recorded in their respective OASys assessments (OASys LTO), is very apparent. The exception to this is accommodation, where the respective levels are very similar.

 

Of the other needs, the level of need in OASys is far higher than the 8 Ways figure for five of the six needs. For ETE, the opposite is true, where the 8 Ways figure is more than double the OASys figure.

 

The average number of needs per case are 2.96 for 8 Ways and 3.50 in OASys.

 

The biggest differences between the 8 Ways and Probation caseload data occur for ETE (Employment Training & Education) and Families.

With regard to the Families need, it should be noted that, within 8 Ways, this refers to Children & Families whereas; the Probation comparator is taken from the Relationships section of OASys. As there isn’t necessarily a direct link between the two, any comparison should be treated with further caution.

 

Almost six out of ten (57%) 8 Ways participants have needs associated with ETE, whilst almost half (47%) have Attitude issues.

 

Almost four out of ten (39%) have Accommodation needs.

 

58% of Probation cases are deemed to have Alcohol Misuse needs, which are linked to their offending. However, only 37% of 8 Ways cases admit to having problems in this area.

 

 

Summary of Costs and Benefits

The 8 Ways scheme exists to reduce crime and re-offending. Its success is determined by measuring the reductions in arrests, convictions and the cost of these crimes.

 

The number of arrests has reduced by 71%.

The number of convictions is also down by 76%.

The cost of crime has decreased by 76%.

 

 

Arrests

In the twelve months prior to joining the 8 Ways scheme, the 51 offenders were arrested a total of 331 times, at an average of 6.5 each.

 

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 8

 

Using the average figure and, based upon the length of time on the scheme (total number of days), the cohort would have been expected to have been arrested a total of 110 times during the period of supervision.

 

In actual fact, they have been arrested a total of 32 times, which is a reduction on the expected figure of 71%. This exceeds the arrest reduction target of 67%

 

Twenty three (45%) of the participants have been arrested.

 

 

Convictions

In the twelve months prior to joining the 8 Ways scheme, the 51 offenders were convicted for a total of 364 crimes, at an average of 8.5 each.

 

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 9

 

Using the average figure and, based upon the length of time on the scheme (total number of days), the cohort would have been expected to have been convicted of a total of 121 crimes during the period of supervision. In actual fact, they have been convicted of a total of 29 crimes, with a further 3 pending.

 

This represents a reduction on the expected figure of 76%, which exceeds the conviction reduction target of 75%.

 

Nineteen (37%) of the participants have been convicted.

 

 

Cost of Crime

Each crime or, type of crime, has a cost attributed to it. The figures are derived from the Home Office ‘Cost of Crime’ costs and cover expenses incurred by the NHS, Police, Probation, Courts, Prison and victims.

 

In the twelve months prior to joining the 8 Ways scheme, the 51 offenders were convicted of 364 crimes, which cost society £636,000, at an average of more than £12,000 each.

 

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 10

 

Using the average figure and, based upon the length of time on the scheme (total number of days), the expected total of 121 crimes would have cost £212,000.

As it is, the actual cost of the 32 crimes (29 convicted and 3 impending) for which they have been convicted is just under £52,000.

 

This represents a reduction on the expected figure of 76%.

 

8 Ways Performance Monitoring Report image 11

 

At the beginning of the scheme and, based on prior knowledge of the likely cohort of offenders, the potential cost savings were predicted, in order to provide a measure of progress and performance.

As can be seen, the savings made in the first nine months of the scheme exceed the predicted (target) figures. The Enhanced Cost Reduction figures take account of the fact that offenders estimate that they are only ‘caught’ for 25% of the crimes they commit.